Accepting Depression

I’ve made it no secret that I have depression and anxiety. It’s very much a key aspect of who I am. It shapes how I view the world, it’s the lens I make decisions through. It’s my very core – I don’t know who I am without depression and anxiety. Despite meds (which is my choice!), despite therapy (again, my choice – I am currently choosing not to be in therapy but that isn’t a choice I have always made or had the option of making), despite hospitalization in the past… it’s very much a part of me.

I don’t know who I am without depression. I don’t know who I am without OCD. I don’t know who I am without anxiety. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Part of accepting being disabled has been accepting depression. Accepting anxiety. Accepting OCD.

It doesn’t mean it’s not disabling. Oh lord, it doesn’t. It doesn’t mean I don’t learn coping skills or ways to navigate the world. That’s silly to think I don’t. But it does mean that I realize it’s a part of me and I make accommodations in the world to make it possible for me to get around. It might mean I need a friend to talk me down when anxiety brain goes haywire. It might mean that some nights I need someone to watch fluffy and/or crappy YouTube videos with me. It might mean that some nights I’m just a puddle of exhaustion and brain cooties.

And that’s okay, because it’s my normal. That’s okay, because it’s the person I am. Accepting my limits, accepting my flaws has been crucial in accepting who I am. It doesn’t mean I glorify it, by no means do I. I don’t think it’s amazing to be depressed, I don’t think it’s great to have soul crushing anxiety that impacts every little thing I do.

But I do think it’s okay to accept it.

I do think it’s okay to say that other people need to accept it if they want to be my friend and interact with me. I do think that it’s wrong that when many people find out that I am psychiatrically disabled, their immediate reaction is “you need meds”, “you need therapy”, etc before they even interact with me and find out why I am the way I am.

Accepting my disabilities has allowed me to accept who I am. It’s high time for other people to accept them now, too.

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