Day of Acceptance 2017

I feel like there’s something telling to be said about the fact it’s the disability day of acceptance And the fact I’m having one of my GI flares. I’m sure I could write some profound analogy…but that would involve my stomach not staging a mutiny. But that’s neither here nor there and I really don’t want to write about the president today – my already unstable health cannot take it.

But today is the disability day of acceptance. For those new to my blog or my life (hi new friend!), I am multiply disabled. I am autistic. I am physically disabled. I have an alphabet soup of brain cooties. I don’t even want to start counting my physical ailments but there are a crapton.

I was born disabled, vs having acquired disability. I don’t know what it’s like to be able-bodied and I never will. I have been both accused of minimizing the impact my disability has and of using my disability as an excuse or exaggerating it. I’ve been told that I cannot do things because I’m disabled and that I should suck it up, buttercup.

I’ve been told I am literally incapable of holding a job and this is true. I do volunteer stuff and my advocacy stuff but I cannot hold a job. My disability¬†does not allow that.¬†I’m a college drop out. I will never be capable of going back to get my degree. I will never be capable of having a job. These are things that society says I have to do, to be a good person. To be a valuable person. To be worthwhile in society. So many people place my worth on what I cannot do, vs the things I can do.

Part of growing has been accepting my disability. I dropped out of college three years ago. I should have graduated from college in December of 2014. I was literally a semester and a half away from graduating. But I couldn’t, because I’m disabled.

Disabled children become disabled adults. And accepting this as a reality is hard. I wasn’t ever expected to live on my own, but I did. Even though I ultimately wound up moving in with friends because living alone did not work for me. For years, I tried to deny the fact I was disabled. You’re talking to the person that literally had to be threatened with putting in the hospital in order to convince her to stay home from college classes. I was very much of the “push through, it isn’t that bad, it’s all in your head” mindset. This actually made my disability worse – this made my health worse. Because I couldn’t do the thing even though I tried to insist I could.

Today is the disability day of acceptance. And I’m here to say my life is worth living. Despite people thinking budget cuts should be made to avoid that. Despite people saying that I’d be better off dead than disabled. Despite people saying that I don’t deserve health insurance. I’ve accepted my disability and it’s time for you to accept it as well.

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