Accepting Nora-mal

I have both acquired and congenital disability. That means that some of my disabilities I developed as I got older – like Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome and POTS. Others I was born with, like autism and NF. I’m also a millennial. I’m from the age of being told I can do anything I set my mind to. That I have to go to college and get my degree. I was literally told that because I was smart (despite autism, dysgraphia, and dyscalucia), I could do anything. Because I graduated with honors I was expected to do well in college. I ultimately dropped out due to my health, leaving behind a staggering $100K student loan debt.

At various times in my life, I’ve been accused of both minimizing and over-reporting my disability. I’ve been told that I can do anything and that I need to set limits for myself. I’ve been told that the only disability in life is a bad attitude (which you can read about why that’s bullshit here) and that I’m not disabled, I’m “differently abled” (which guess what? THAT’S BULLSHIT!). I’ve also been told, to my face, that because I’m disabled I should aim to be people’s inspiration. That’s inspiration porn, and, you guessed it, BULLSHIT.

Here’s the thing, folks. There’s nothing wrong with accepting I have limits. There’s nothing wrong with aspiring to do things. There’s nothing wrong with just being. It’s okay to try, it’s okay to fail, and it’s okay not to try. I have accepted that I will never have a college degree. No, online college is not an option. No, community college is not in the cards. No, a different school will not be a better fit.

Nora-mal is who I am. Not normal. Not different. I just am. And there’s nothing wrong with just being. There’s nothing wrong with not getting a degree. This is Nora-mal. This is what’s right for me. What’s right for me may not be right for you. You may choose to get a degree. You may not. You may think I’m capable of getting a degree. I’m not. I’m not capable of a degree or gainful employment. There’s nothing wrong with that because that’s just  the way things are.

For me, accepting that I’m disabled has made a difference in my mental health. Accepting that I have limits and that I cannot do all the things I was told I could do. That, for me, is a victory.

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