Image
0

Do you know what ableism is?

Image is of a pink hot air balloon against blue clouds. Text reads "Ableism is living in a world that is not equipped for me.

Image is of a pink hot air balloon against blue clouds. Text reads “Ableism is living in a world that is not equipped for me.

 

 

Do you know what ableism is? Do you know what it’s like to live your life when ableism is facing you literally every time you turn around? Do you know what it’s like to be disabled in an ableist society? Do you know what it’s like to be autistic in a world that’s crafted for neurotypicals? Do you know what it’s like to be physically disabled in a world that actively oppresses your very existence? Ableism is living in a world that’s not equipped for me.

I am Autistic. Ableism is when people insist on erasing my identity, and calling me a “person with autism”, despite the language I have chosen for myself. Ableism is when people force me to look into their eyes, even when eye contact is physically painful. Ableism is when people judge me for stimming in public. Ableism is when people refuse and try to make me into something that is actually impossible for me, due to being Autistic.

I have major depressive disorder. Ableism is just telling me to have more vitamin C, exercise more, get out more, etc. No! This will not help my depression. What I need for you is to listen to me when I tell you how to support me. Not to scold me for making the choice to be on antidepressants. Not to belittle me for the way I cope.

I am physically disabled. Ableism is telling me to stop seeing so many doctors. To just have a more upbeat attitude. This is not acceptable.

I have cognitive and executive functioning problems. Ableism is telling me to just get over it. Ableism is telling me to suck it up and do it. Ableism is telling me that you believe in me and I can do the thing, even when the thing is actually impossible for me. It isn’t as simple as just getting up and doing it. I actually cannot. I am not wired that way.

Ableism is when parents tell me I am not like their child. That I am so high functioning. Ableism is insisting on using functioning labels, even when I tell you that I don’t like them and in fact, actively oppose them. Ableism is insisting on calling my impairments mild or severe, despite the fact that some aspects are mild and others are severe. It isn’t black and white like that.

These are aspects of ableism I face in my life every single day as a disabled adult. Feel free to comment on what ones you face. I know I’ve missed so many as ableism isn’t a one size fits all and something every single disabled person faces.

 

Leave a Reply