Spoonie Terms 101

Becoming  a member of a spoonie, or chronic illness community , can be overwhelming with all the jargon and lingo. So I’ve created a document to help you navigate your way through it. There are helpful links, etc. This was originally written for the Spoonies Without Judgment  Facebook group, and feel free to join if you’re looking for a place to call home. I help admin there and we don’t bite. Well, not too hard. Hee.

Terms:

Ableism: Stella Young said it best in her TedTalk. Basically, if it’s not something you would say to someone who is currently able bodied, don’t say it to someone with a disability. This blog post of mine sums up the problems with ableism and why it’s currently a problem. Not to toot my own horn, but I think it’s pretty stinking good!

Ablesplain: I’m just going to pull out a quote from this link because it says it far better than I could:

“In a nutshell, ‘splainin’ is an “explanation” which is put forward in the most patronizing way possible. The ‘splainer feels passionately that ou opinion and beliefs outweigh actual lived experience and wishes to inform everyone of this fact. ‘splainers are unfortunately especially common in safe spaces in which the voices of people living in marginalized bodies are centered, because such spaces are threatening to people who find our voices contrary to their worldviews.

‘splainers feel the need to put their oar in on conversations where they may not specifically be welcome or even wanted, often with an air of entitlement. They approach the conversation from the position that people must be ignorant if they think/experience differently than the ‘splainer does, and that a few rounds in comments will sort them out and bring them over to the side of right. One of the many reasons that this can be harmful is that often people are just starting to come to the place where they feel comfortable asserting their lived experience, because they’ve been taken in by arguments like those presented by the ‘splainer for their whole lives, and seeing those arguments again can set off a spiral of self doubt, confusion, and self loathing.”

Aspie/Autie: Slang for an autistic person. Some people like these terms, some people don’t. Choose to use them if you want, choose not to use them if you want.

Brain fog: “Brain fog”, also know as “fibro fog”, “pain fog” or “med fog” is the feeling when pain or meds make it hard to think. It kind of feels like you’re swimming through pea soup or mashed potatoes. You forget things easy, mix up terms, say the wrong thing, etc.

Bump: Boosting a post up if it has no replies or not a definitive answer. This helps it to come back up.

CW/TW: Content warning or trigger warning. A trigger warning is something that could case acute distress such as types of abuse. A content warning is something that may trigger a phobia and is considered more of a “heads up” than an actual trigger.

Crip: Slang from cripple. Many have decided to reclaim it as their own word and to use it for themselves. The choice is yours to use it or not. Do not use it as an insult – such as “you’re such a crip!” in a cruel way. However, it is often used in a tongue-in-cheek way such as “crip perks”, etc.

Flare: A flare is an acute acting up of your chronic illness. So, if you see someone saying “I am having a fibro flare” today, it means their fibro is currently acting up.

Gimp: See “crip”. Just another word for the same thing.

Image description: An image description is telling someone what’s going on in the picture. This is used for low vision/blind people, screen readers, low bandwidth, etc. If you aren’t sure how to write one, read this. It’s also perfectly okay to ask for help!

Muggle: Muggle is just a term we use for non-spoonies. It’s usually used in a tongue-in-cheek way or in jest.

muggle sick: “normal people sick”. So, if you have a cold, you’re “muggle sick”.

Signal boost: A signal boost is posting something in a group or on your timeline that needs attention. For example, a couple years ago there was a recall of epi-pens (something used for people who have severe allergies). People would post them with the words “signal boost”, meaning it’s important and something should read and share, even if it doesn’t affect them directly. This is mostly done for allergy warnings, med or food recalls, or things that could threaten a life.

Spoon debt: Reaching into your spare “spoons”, or energy, to do something but it means you won’t have said energy or spoons tomorrow. It can be near impossible to catch back up.

Spoonie: Taken from the spoon theory A spoonie is merely someone who suffers from chronic illness.
Painsomina: Pain + insomnia. AKA a living hell. You can’t sleep because of pain, even though you’re SO freaking tired.

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